Which one of these TV comedies will be the most popular in 2018?

In 2018, there’s no shortage of comedy shows that are set in an educational setting.

Here are a few we’ll be talking about this week.

SALLYS WELLTER: When Sarah Waters (the host of “The Colbert Report”) tells her friend (played by Jason Bateman) that she wants to teach her how to cook, she tells her husband (played, of course, by David Schwimmer) that if he wants to help out, he should make a meal.

The episode ends with the two friends getting ready to go out to dinner, and when they get there, the waitress tells them they need to have a “good meal.”

She asks if they want a chicken sandwich, and Sarah says no.

But they do.

After the meal, she asks her friend if he has any “good eggs.”

The friend says no, but he adds that they should probably try the other one.

It turns out that the “good egg” in question is actually a really good, very flavorful chicken breast.

They get the “bad egg” of chicken, and that one is actually pretty good.

SWEET LOVING DAD: This season of “Community” was inspired by the life of the late Bob Seger, who died of cancer at age 57.

“Seger’s Dads” is the story of his family, and it’s pretty damn funny.

In the first season, he and his son, Sam, had a real family, which was always a source of amusement for everyone, including Seger himself.

When Sam went into hospice care, his parents thought they were losing him, but Seger told them he was “just a dad,” and they couldn’t believe it.

They were so sad for him.

They tried to bury him, and he eventually returned.

He and Sam were both born with a disability.

In this episode, Seger’s dad, Jim Seger (Tom Kenny), has to teach his son how to make soup, and the boy is very happy to learn how.

It’s one of those episodes where the viewer is left wondering what’s funny about this, but it’s also one of the funniest episodes on the show.

TALK ABOUT BEING STUPID: “TALK ABOUT BEDTIME” is a series that takes place in the late 1970s in an elementary school, and one of its main characters is a boy named Bobby.

Bobby has a special ability, called “Bedtime Talk,” which allows him to talk to his bedtime friends.

He is not very popular, and in fact, his teachers and classmates don’t like him.

But when he asks them to take his homework, they can’t resist his offer to help him with his homework.

In a classroom filled with his peers, Bobby manages to make the class laugh and to cheer him up, and as a result, he’s given a lot of support in his class.

Bobby gets his teacher to make him some cookies and then he’s out in the hall, having a great time, until one of his classmates, Bobby’s best friend, comes to talk about his favorite part of bedtime.

The other kids don’t understand what he’s talking about, so he tells them that it’s Bobby’s favorite part, and then Bobby goes on to tell his friends about his bedtimes.

Bobby and his friends make Bobby’s bedtime special, and Bobby is now one of them.

He even makes Bobby do his homework for him, which makes him very happy.

It was a very special episode.

MADE FROM THE STORE: “The Makers” was a short-lived TV series that was created by Michael O’Donnell and originally aired on the ABC network in 1984.

The show, created by O’Neill and David Levinson, starred a group of people who were given a special job, which included making a product called “Makers.”

The job was to create the perfect set of “Masters” glasses, which would allow the viewers to see their reflection from a certain angle, and they had to make all the glass pieces to fit into a single, small box.

The Makers were made from the store shelves and the employees in the store were required to give the glasses to the customers who were the “Masons.”

One of the people who made these glasses was Jimi Hendrix, and Hendrix loved the idea of having the perfect glass.

The idea was that Hendrix would wear the glasses on stage and sing to the crowd.

That’s how the show came about, and this was the first show to make a million dollars.

MULTIPLE MEN: This one has to be one of my favorite episodes on television.

It features two separate groups of people working on the same project.

One group of men (played both by Chris Hardwick and Kevin